Is the brain smarter than a computer?

Knowing Neurons is proud to present our inaugural entry in a new series of YouTube videos!  In this episode, Joel asks, “Is the brain smarter than a computer?”  With Joel as our tour guide, we embark on a journey through neurobiology, psychology, supercomputing, quantum physics, and even philosophy, all the while stopping on the street to ask the common person for thoughts and opinions.  Along the way, you’ll learn in what ways humans outperform computers, in what ways computers outperform humans, how the world’s most powerful supercomputers are simulating the human brain, the limits of human memory, how chess grandmasters memorize chess positions, what information in your brain is accessible to your conscious mind, and what it means to live in a simulation.

Buckle your seat belts, sit back, relax, and enjoy the show!

Is the brain a computer? (0:00)

Interviews and opinions (0:55)

Blue Brain Project (2:47)

Working memory (3:23)

Neural computation (5:00)

K-computer simulation (5:59)

What is reality? (6:59)

Schrodinger’s Cat and the Copenhagen interpretation (8:06)

Outro (8:29)

Bonus (9:04)

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Joel Frohlich

Joel Frohlich graduated from the College of William and Mary in 2012 with a BS in neuroscience. He is currently working towards his PhD in the lab of Shafali Jeste at UCLA, examining EEG biomarkers of neurodevelopmental disorders. His recent research has focused specifically on autism and duplication 15q11.2-13.1 (Dup15q) syndrome. He is also a student intern at F. Hoffmann-La Roche in Basel, Switzerland and an expert blogger for Psychology Today. When he is not engaged in neuroscience, Joel's other hobbies include exploring national parks and reading about other fields of science such as astronomy and space exploration.
Profile photo of Joel Frohlich

Joel Frohlich

View posts by Joel Frohlich
Joel Frohlich graduated from the College of William and Mary in 2012 with a BS in neuroscience. He is currently working towards his PhD in the lab of Shafali Jeste at UCLA, examining EEG biomarkers of neurodevelopmental disorders. His recent research has focused specifically on autism and duplication 15q11.2-13.1 (Dup15q) syndrome. He is also a student intern at F. Hoffmann-La Roche in Basel, Switzerland and an expert blogger for Psychology Today. When he is not engaged in neuroscience, Joel's other hobbies include exploring national parks and reading about other fields of science such as astronomy and space exploration.

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