Reverse Engineering the Brain

  • Can we learn everything about the brain by studying individual brain cells?

    It started with a simple equation. In 1980, a mathematician named Benoit Mandelbrot working for IBM plotted the behavior of points on a plane using a computer. When the plane was colored by the results, a whimsical world emerged: infinitely branching scepters and spirals, never ending chasms, endless tentacles growing from heart-shaped bulbs. It appears as something from the final trippy minutes of Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, only much stranger, like a tie-dye painted by insane space aliens.

    The Mandelbrot set shows complexity no matter how far we zoom in. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

    Almost none of the complexity of the eponymous Mandelbrot set is readily obvious from the equation Benoit Mandelbrot plotted. Pick a pair of numbers, one real and one imaginary. Now multiply this pair by itself, many many times, and count the number of iterations it takes to exceed a certain magnitude, or distance from zero. Color each coordinate pair on the plane according to the number of iterations that point took to grow above the threshold. And viola! Complexity is born.

    The shocking depth of complexity found in the Mandelbrot set may teach neuroscientists a lesson about emergent properties. Emergent properties are crucial to understanding complexity and the brain. Unlike simple phenomena, like the swinging of a pendulum, emergent properties such as intelligence and consciousness cannot be understood by merely studying simple parts of a system. Even holding the rulebook, in the case of Mandelbrot, may not readily show how the rules result in complexity. Why does squaring each number and adding back the result create such a beautifully complex pattern? Why does a particular pattern of neural connections allow for language and intelligence? To be sure, mapping cells and their synaptic connections to other cells in the brain has value. If nothing else, such maps outline which communication routes are possible. But this alone is not enough.

    Closely related to emergent properties is the concept of self-organization. This is the idea that new phenomena can result from interactions between parts, with no one part leading or controlling the system. Consider the tiny worm C. elegans. Mapping all 302 neurons and synapses in the adult hermaphrodite worm should, by the opposing logic of reductionism, turn the scientist into a prescient wizard who can foresee how the worm responds to every possible stimulus. And yet, such knowledge has lead to only modest insights into C. elegans‘ behavior. Does this suggest that we still don’t fully know the rules for how these neurons interact? Or is the simulation still not detailed enough?

    C. elegans Knowing Neurons
    The roundworm C. elegans. Adult hermaphrodites have exactly 302 neurons.

    Sometimes we need more firepower. If we have enough powerful computers, this reasoning goes, a simulation will show us how every wiggle and breath results from each poke and prod. Such is the justification for the Human Brain Project (HBP), an undertaking co-funded by the European Union that has inherited goals from Switzerland’s Blue Brain project. Lead by neuroscientist Henry Markham at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, HBP aspires to run a massive simulation of a human brain using the vast firepower of supercomputers across Europe. Not the least of these is an IBM blue geneA sequence of nucleic acids that forms a unit of genetic inh... More supercomputer performing nearly six quadrillion(6 x 10<sup>15</sup>) floating point operations per second!

    “Other gaps in our knowledge … underscore the possible hubris of such a moonshot level undertaking.”

    In the case of the Mandelbrot set, computers were the key to unlocking complexity—without their laborious firepower, it is likely that no human would ever see the haunting patterns that emerge from a simple equation. But for an emergent property to be simulated by a computer, the complete rulebook must be known. As we discover new molecules and developmental trends in the brain, our humility grows with our knowledge. Are we actually ready to build a computer model of the human brain when, as recently as several years ago, a widely accepted model of neural connections in the adult brain known as the tripartite synapseConnections between neurons where a signal is passed from on... More was found to be wrong? And there is still some disagreement among neuroscientists on questions as basic as how and where memories are stored in the brain. Other gaps in our knowledge—such “orphan” receptors whose neurotransmitterChemicals that cross some synapses and carry a signal to the... More parents have not yet been discovered—underscore the possible hubris of such a moonshot level undertaking.

    It’s important to emphasize that even small discoveries of this sort matter. Small causes may have big effects. This concept, known as nonlinearity, underlies complex systems. In Mandelbrot’s case, changing the position of a point on the plane by a hair may completely alter its color or magnitude. In the brain’s case, slightly adjusting the resting voltageThe potential energy between two points in space felt by an ... More of neurons may completely alter their collective activity. Nonlinear interaction between parts is central to self-organization.

    “A true reverse engineering approach requires understanding the brain on its most abstract level.”

    In the Mandelbrot set, patterns on all scales exists, even if the observer zooms in for infinity. While the brain does not exhibit a truly infinite range of complexity, it does exhibit structure and activity over a vast range of different scales of space and time. Complex connectivity patterns are observed from microscopic synapses to the whole-brain scale. This facet of brain complexity urges us not to build our understanding of the brain only on cells, but all relevant scales. Indeed, the “functional unit” of the nervous system is sometimes identified as the neuronThe functional unit of the nervous system, a nerve cell that... More, but also as larger structures known as cell assemblies and neocortical columns.

    Markham has closed a TED talk by suggesting his model brain might one day speak to humans through a hologram. Herculean goals of simulating consciousness or otherwise biting off more than the project can chew have been criticisms of HBP. But if we cannot understand emergent properties through vast computer simulations like HBP, how can we understand the brain? Is reverse engineering the brain possible?

    A true reverse engineering approach requires understanding the brain on its most abstract level. Such holistic understanding transcends knowing that a gene or brain region is needed for memory or cognition—it explains how and why. A paper published in the journal Neuron in February calls for neuroscientists to consider how a circuit in the brain could or should work before dissecting it with a plethora of tools, just as one needs to understand such concepts as aerodynamics and lift before studying a bird’s wing. This idea, which originated with the late neuroscientist David Marr, implies that HBP first needs a theory for how language or consciousness could emerge from neurons and synapses before blindly simulating billions of them.

    Until we know how and why a certain pattern of activity or piece of brain tissue is needed for behavior, we can’t really claim that we understand the brain. In the meantime, there will always be room for theoreticians outside the lab to ponder our behaviors and ask what biological machinery could beget such complexity. The foundation of neuroscience need not be merely single cells, but also great ideas.

    This post originally appeared on Psychology Today.

    Image by Jooyeun Lee

    References:

    Bullmore, E., & Sporns, O. (2009). Complex brain networks: graph theoretical analysis of structural and functional systems.

    Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 10(3), 186-198.

    Jabr, F. (2012). The connectome debate: is mapping the mind of a worm worth it. Scientific American,(October 2, 2012).

    Jacbonson, R. (2015). Memories May Not Live in Neurons’ Synapses. Scientific American, (April 1, 2015).

    Krakauer, J. W., Ghazanfar, A. A., Gomez-Marin, A., MacIver, M. A., & Poeppel, D. (2017). Neuroscience needs behavior: correcting a reductionist Bias. Neuron, 93(3), 480-490.

    Theil, S. (2015). Why the Human Brain Project went wrong—and how to fix it. Scientific American, 313(4).

  • Das Gehirn nachbauen

    Können wir alles über das Gehirn erfahren, indem wir einzelne Gehirnzellen untersuchen?

    Die Mandelbrot Menge
    Die Mandelbrot Menge zeigt Komplexität, egal wie weit wir hinein zoomen. Bildquelle: Wikimedia Commons

    Es begann mit einer einfachen Gleichung. 1980 stellte ein Mathematiker namens Benoit Mandelbrot, der für IBM arbeitete, das Verhalten von Punkten auf einer Ebene mithilfe eines Computers dar. Wenn die Ebene durch die Ergebnisse eingefärbt wurde, trat eine skurrile Welt zuvor: unendlich teilende Zepter und Spiralen, nicht enden wollende Kluften und endlose Tentakel, die herzförmigen Knollen entwuchsen. Es erschien wie etwas aus den letzten Minuten von Kubricks 2001: Odyssee im Weltraum, nur noch seltsamer, wie eine Batik verrückter Außerirdischer.

    Kaum etwas dieser Komplexität der Mandelbrot-Menge ist aus der Gleichung, die Benoit Mandelbrot aufzeichnete, offensichtlich. Nimm ein Zahlenpaar, eine Zahl ist real und eine imaginär. Nun multipliziere dieses Paar viele Male mit sich selbst, und zähle die Anzahl an Iterationen die benötigt werden, um einen bestimmten Betrag, oder Distanz von Null, zu überschreiten. Nun färbe jedes Koordinatenpaar der Ebene danach ein, wie viele Iterationen der Punkt benötigte, um den gegebenen Grenzwert zu überschreiten. Und voila! Komplexität ist geboren.

    Die schockierende Komplexität der Mandelbrot-Menge kann Neurowissenschaftlern eine Lehrstunde über emergente Eigenschaften geben. Emergente Eigenschaften sind entscheidend für das Verständnis von Komplexität und dem Gehirn. Anders als einfache Phänomene, wie dem Schwingen eines Pendels, können wir emergente Eigenschaften wie Intelligenz und Bewusstsein nicht verstehen, indem wir die einzelnen Teile des Systems untersuchen. Selbst wenn wir das Regelwerk in Händen halten, wie im Fall von Mandelbrot, zeigt uns das möglicherweise nicht bereitwillig, wie die Regeln in Komplexität resultieren. Warum erhalten wir ein so schönes komplexes Muster, wenn wir jede Zahl ins Quadrat erheben und das Ergebnis dazu addieren? Wie kann ein bestimmtes Muster an neuralen Verknüpfungen Sprache und Intelligenz ermöglichen? Natürlich, das Kartieren von Zellen und ihrer synaptischen Verbindungen mit anderen Zellen im Gehirn hat seinen Wert. Wenn sonst nichts, so zeigen solche Karten, welche Kommunikationswege möglich sind. Aber das alleine ist nicht genug.

    Eng verwandt mit emergenten Eigenschaften ist das Konzept der Selbstorganisation. Das ist die Vorstellung, dass neue Phänomene durch die Interaktion zwischen Teilen entstehen, ohne dass ein Teil das System leitet oder kontrolliert. Schauen wir uns den kleinen Wurm C. elegans an. Das Kartieren aller 302 Neuronen und Synapsen im erwachsenen hermaphroditen Wurm sollte, gemäß der entgegengesetzten Logik des Reduktionismus, den Wissenschaftler in einen Hellseher verwandeln, der voraussehen kann, wie der Wurm auf jeden möglichen Reiz antwortet. Und doch hat dieses Wissen nur zu geringen Einsichten in das Verhalten von C. elegans geführt. Bedeutet das, dass wir die Regeln, nach denen diese Neuronen interagieren, noch nicht vollständig genug kennen? Oder ist die Simulation noch nicht detailliert genug?

    C. elegans Knowing Neurons
    Der Fadenwurm C. elegans. Ausgewachsene hermaphrodite Tiere besitzen genau 302 Neuronen.

    Manchmal brauchen wir mehr Feuerkraft. Wenn wir genügend leistungsstarke Computer haben, so können uns die Simulationen – gemäß dieser Argumentation –zeigen, wie jede Bewegung und jeder Atem aus jedem Schubsen resultiert. Das ist die Begründung für das Human Brain Project (HBP), eine Unternehmung ko-finanziert von der Europäischen Union, die die Ziele des Schweizer Blue Brain Projects geerbt hat. Geleitet vom Neurowissenschaftler Henry Markham an der Eidgenössischen Technischen Hochschule in Lausanne, zielt das HBP darauf ab, eine riesige Simulation des menschlichen Gehirns mithilfe der gewaltigen Feuerkraft von Supercomputern in ganz Europa durchzuführen. Nicht der Geringste davon ist ein IBM blue gene Supercomputer, der fast sechs Billiarden (10<sup>15</sup>) Gleitkommaoperationen pro Sekunde durchführt!

    Andere Lücken in unserem Wissen … unterstreichen die mögliche Hybris einer solchen, dem Mondflug nicht unähnlichen, Unternehmung

    Im Fall der Mandelbrot-Menge waren Computer der Schlüssel zum Lösen der Komplexität – ohne ihre arbeitsame Feuerkraft ist es wahrscheinlich, dass kein Mensch je die eindringlichen Muster gesehen hätte, die aus einer einfachen Gleichung entstehen. Aber damit eine emergente Eigenschaft von einem Computer simuliert wird, muss das gesamte Regelwerk bekannt sein. Während wir neue Moleküle und Trends der Entwicklung im Gehirn entdecken, wächst mit unserem Wissen auch unsere Demut. Sind wir wirklich bereit, ein Computermodel des menschlichen Gehirns zu bauen, wenn sich, wie wir vor wenigen Jahren sahen, ein breit akzeptiertes Model der neuralen Verbindungen im erwachsenen Gehirn, bekannt als tripartite Synapse, als falsch herausstellte? Und es herrscht weiterhin Uneinigkeit zwischen Neurowissenschaftlern über grundlegende Fragen, etwa wie und wo das Gehirn Erinnerungen abspeichert. Andere Lücken in unserem Wissen – wie etwa „Waisenrezeptoren“, deren entsprechende Neurotransmitter noch nicht entdeckt wurden – unterstreichen die mögliche Hybris einer solchen, dem Mondflug nicht unähnlichen, Unternehmung.

    Es ist wichtig zu betonen, dass selbst kleine Entdeckungen dieser Art wichtig sind. Kleine Ursachen können große Folgen haben. Dieses Konzept, bekannt als Nichtlinearität, liegt komplexen Systemen zugrunde. In Mandelbrots Fall kann die Veränderung eines Punktes in der Ebene um nur eine Haaresbreite seine Farbe oder Betrag vollständig ändern. Im Falle des Gehirns kann eine geringe Änderung der Ruhespannung der Neuronen ihre kollektive Aktivität komplett ändern. Nichtlineare Interaktion zwischen Einzelteilen ist zentral für die Selbstorganisation

    Für eine wahre Nachkonstruktion benötigt man erst ein Verständnis des Gehirns auf der abstraktesten Ebene.

    In der Mandelbrot Menge existieren auf allen Maßstäben Muster, selbst wenn der Beobachter bis in die Unendlichkeit hineinzoomt. Obwohl die Bandbreite an Komplexität im Gehirns nicht unendlich ist, besitzt das Gehirn dennoch Strukturen und Aktivitäten, die eine breite Auswahl an unterschiedlichen zeitlichen und räumlichen Größenordnungen abdecken. Komplexe Verknüpfungsmuster werden von der Ebene der mikroskopischen Synapsen bis hin zur Ebene des gesamten Gehirns beobachtet. Diese Facette der Gehirnkomplexität mahnt uns dazu, unser Verständnis des Gehirns nicht nur auf Zellen zu bauen, sondern auf allen relevanten Größenordnungen. Tatsächlich wird die „funktionale Einheit“ des Nervensystems zwar manchmal als die Nervenzelle identifiziert, aber auch größere Strukturen wie Zellverbände und neokortikale Säulen zählen als funktionale Einheiten.

    Markham schloss einen TED Vortrag mit dem Vorschlag, dass sein Modellgehirn eines Tages mittels Hologramm mit Menschen sprechen könnte. Herkulische Ziele von der Simulation des Bewusstseins oder die Überfrachtung des Projekts waren Kritikpunkte am HBP. Aber wenn wir emergente Eigenschaften nicht durch enorme Computersimulationen wie dem HBP verstehen, wie können wir dann das Gehirn verstehen? Ist es möglich, das Gehirn nachzubauen?

    Für eine wahre Nachkonstruktion benötigt man erst ein Verständnis des Gehirns auf der abstraktesten Ebene. So ein holistisches Verständnis geht darüber hinaus zu wissen, dass ein Gen oder eine Gehirnregion für Gedächtnis oder Kognition benötigt werden – es erklärt wie und warum sie das werden. Ein Artikel, der im Februar im Journal Neuron erschien, ruft Neurowissenschaftler dazu auf, zu überlegen, wie ein Schaltkreis im Gehirn funktionieren könnte oder sollte, bevor er mit einer Vielzahl an Werkzeugen seziert wird – genauso, wie man Konzepte wie Aerodynamik und Auftrieb verstehen sollte, bevor man einen Vogelflügel untersucht. Diese Idee, die ursprünglich vom verstorbenen Neurowissenschaftler David Marr stammt, impliziert, dass das HBP zuerst eine Theorie dafür benötigt, wie Sprache oder Bewusstsein aus Neuronen und Synapsen entstehen, bevor es blindlings Billionen von ihnen simuliert.

    Bis wir wissen, wie und warum ein bestimmtes Aktivitätsmuster oder Gehirngewebe für Verhalten benötigt werden, können wir nicht für uns beanspruchen, dass wir das Gehirn verstehen. Bis dahin wird es weiter Raum für TheoretikerInnen außerhalb des Labors geben, die über unser Verhalten nachdenken und fragen, aus welcher biologischen Maschinerie eine solche Komplexität hervorgehen kann. Die Basis der Neurowissenschaft müssen nicht nur einzelne Zellen sein, sondern auch großartige Ideen.

    Der englische Text erschien zuerst auf Psychology Today.

    Jooyeun Lee

    ~

    Referenzen

    Bullmore, E., & Sporns, O. (2009). Complex brain networks: graph theoretical analysis of structural and functional systems. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 10(3), 186-198.

    Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 10(3), 186-198.

    Jabr, F. (2012). The connectome debate: is mapping the mind of a worm worth it. Scientific American,(October 2, 2012).

    Jacbonson, R. (2015). Memories May Not Live in Neurons’ Synapses. Scientific American, (April 1, 2015).

    Krakauer, J. W., Ghazanfar, A. A., Gomez-Marin, A., MacIver, M. A., & Poeppel, D. (2017). Neuroscience needs behavior: correcting a reductionist Bias. Neuron, 93(3), 480-490.

    Theil, S. (2015). Why the Human Brain Project went wrong—and how to fix it. Scientific American, 313(4).

Joel Frohlich

Joel Frohlich graduated from the College of William and Mary in 2012 with a BS in neuroscience. He is currently working towards his PhD in the lab of Shafali Jeste at UCLA, examining EEGElectroencephalogram, a technique that places electrodes on ... More biomarkers of neurodevelopmental disorders. His recent research has focused specifically on autism and duplication 15q11.2-13.1 (Dup15q) syndrome. He is also a student intern at F. Hoffmann-La Roche in Basel, Switzerland and an expert blogger for Psychology Today. When he is not engaged in neuroscience, Joel's other hobbies include exploring national parks and reading about other fields of science such as astronomy and space exploration.

Joel Frohlich

Joel Frohlich graduated from the College of William and Mary in 2012 with a BS in neuroscience. He is currently working towards his PhD in the lab of Shafali Jeste at UCLA, examining EEG biomarkers of neurodevelopmental disorders. His recent research has focused specifically on autism and duplication 15q11.2-13.1 (Dup15q) syndrome. He is also a student intern at F. Hoffmann-La Roche in Basel, Switzerland and an expert blogger for Psychology Today. When he is not engaged in neuroscience, Joel's other hobbies include exploring national parks and reading about other fields of science such as astronomy and space exploration.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this:
Skip to toolbar