A Grand Vision: A Conversation with Lynne Kiorpes

When babies are born, they cannot see very well, but their vision vastly improves as they continue to develop.  Sometimes, the eyes don’t communicate well with the brain, and vision disorders like amblyopia result.  What are the neural mechanisms that allow normal visual development?  What happens when things go amiss?  And how can these disorders be prevented and treated?  These are the questions that get Professor Lynne Kiorpes up in the morning!  Listen to her passion as she explains her research and life as a neuroscientist:Continue reading

Mental Health is a Part of Health: A Conversation with Shekhar Saxena

In a recent presidential town hall, President Obama looked directly into the camera and made a powerful statement about mental health. “If something inside you feels like it’s wounded, it’s just like a physical injury. You’ve got to go get help,” said the leader of the free world.

Buried under the weight of a massive social stigma, seeking help or even acknowledging a mental illness can be an excruciating task. How, then, can we help ourselves and our loved ones achieve emotional and mental well-being?Continue reading

We won an award!

We are excited to announce that we received the Society for Neuroscience 2016 Next Generation Award. This award recognizes SfN chapter members who have made outstanding contributions to public communication, outreach, and education about neuroscience. To celebrate the award reflecting our dedication to neuroscience education, we, the team members of Knowing Neurons, reminisce over some of their favorite moments in the past year.Continue reading

Inhibitory Neurons: Keeping the Brain’s Traffic in Check

Imagine that you’re driving down a road undeterred, no red lights or stop signs to slow you down. While that may seem like a very exciting idea, it is obviously very dangerous, since our roads are not all parallel, but interconnected in a number of different ways. For traffic to go smoothly in all directions, we have stop signs, red lights, speed bumps and police cars to make sure no accidents occur. Continue reading

Science Fiction, Serendipity and Interneuron Specification: A Conversation with Dr. Gordon J. Fishell

Gordon FishellIt is easy to assume that if a car has a gas pedal, it needs to have brakes, and similarly, if our brain has excitatory neurons, it needs inhibition too. For a long time, the field of neuroscience had thought of inhibitory interneurons as the “brakes” of the brain, providing suppression to neuronal activity. However, in my conversation with Dr. Gordon J. Fishell, I learned that interneurons are far more fascinating cell types than merely being inhibitory! Their multifarious morphology can be attributed to a palette of functions in brain developmental and regulation.Continue reading

Get Ready for #SfN14 with #KnowingNeurons

This is an exciting time for neuroscience!  The Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine was just awarded to three neuroscientists “for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain.”  John O’Keefe is best known for his work on place cells in the hippocampus, and May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser study grid cells in the entorhinal cortex.  Together, these cells provide an internal map of the external environment.  In a way, they act as a GPS in the brain that can even navigate our 3D world!Continue reading

Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting 2013 by Knowing Neurons

The Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting 2013

This is BIG week for neuroscience!

Each year more than 30,000 neuroscientists from more than 80 countries come together in the largest scientific meeting in the world!  At the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) annual meeting, neuroscientists present their newest scientific discoveries about the brain, spinal cord, and nervous system.  More than 15,500 presentations are given, ranging in topic from molecules to human behavior.  Over 500 exhibitors share new tools and cutting edge technologies at this largest neuroscience marketplace in the world.  In this exciting environment, you can learn from experts, collaborate with peers, and explore all things neuroscience!Continue reading