The Mighty and the Weak: How Science Explains Cuteness

Cute things are usually vulnerable, fragile and weak.  But cuteness itself is mighty indeed. Morten L. Kringelbach and his colleagues at the University of Oxford recently described cuteness as ‘one… Read more

What Loneliness Looks Like in the Brain

Consider three scenarios.  A kid joins a new high school and eats lunch by herself.  A recently separated man is alone for the New Year’s Eve countdown.  A prisoner becomes… Read more

Neuron See, Neuron Do: The Mirror Neuron System and Clinical Implications

If you grew up with siblings, it is likely that you have heard the phrase, ”Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.”  However, it wasn’t until a groundbreaking finding in… Read more

Is too much sugar a form of brain abuse?

We all know too much sugar is bad for us.  But did you know that having unfettered access to sugar might produce brain changes similar to highly stressful situations, such… Read more

LSD: Psychedelic Thrill or Optimism Pill?

If you’re in a room with ten adults, chances are two of them are going to develop a mental illness –- and only one of them will receive proper treatment.… Read more

The Strange Relationship between Nicotine and Parkinson’s Disease

According to the World Health Organization, smoking is responsible for approximately 6 million deaths in the world every year or one fatality every six seconds.  71% of all lung cancers… Read more

The Departure of Skill Memories from Motor Cortex: Deeper Directions for Neuroscience

You probably have certain skills that I don’t.  Each of us, having spent enough time practicing something new, can become an expert.  A simple, ubiquitous example is driving a car… Read more

Science Advocacy on Capitol Hill: Bridging the Legislative Gap to Medical Research Funding

Last Thursday, September 17th I had the privilege of joining over 300 organizations including patients, physicians and fellow researchers in the Rally for Medical Research on Capitol Hill. Now in… Read more
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